July252014
fishstickmonkey:

Photograph of the facade of Cave 19, at Ajanta. Henry Cousens, 1869.
British Library

fishstickmonkey:

Photograph of the facade of Cave 19, at Ajanta. Henry Cousens, 1869.

British Library

July242014
smithsonianlibraries:

Oh, hello there!
Friendly skeleton from Natural History for the use of schools and families (1864)

smithsonianlibraries:

Oh, hello there!

Friendly skeleton from Natural History for the use of schools and families (1864)

(via theolduvaigorge)

July232014
ancientpeoples:

Ivory horse frontlet 
Decorated with a nude goddess holding lions and lotus flowers
Mesopotamian, Assyrian Period, Neo-Assyrian, 9th - 8th century BC. 
Source: Metropolitan Museum

ancientpeoples:

Ivory horse frontlet 

Decorated with a nude goddess holding lions and lotus flowers

Mesopotamian, Assyrian Period, Neo-Assyrian, 9th - 8th century BC. 

Source: Metropolitan Museum

July222014
hinducosmos:

The submerged temples of Mahabalipuram (India)
According to popular belief, the famous Shore Temple at Mahabalipuram wasn’t a single temple, but the last of a series of seven temples, six of which had submerged. New finds suggest that there may be some truth to the story.
A major discovery of submerged ruins was made in April of 2002 offshore of Mahabalipuram in Tamil Nadu, South India. The discovery, at depths of 5 to 7 meters (15 to 21 feet) was made by a joint team from the Dorset based Scientific Exploration Society (SES) and marine archaeologists from India’s National Institute of Oceanography (NIO).
Investigations at each of the locations revealed stone masonry, remains of walls, square rock cut remains, scattered square and rectangular stone blocks and a big platform with steps leading to it. All these lay amidst the locally occurring geological formations of rocks.
—- 7 Most Fascinating Underwater Ruins : Oddee.com

hinducosmos:

The submerged temples of Mahabalipuram (India)

According to popular belief, the famous Shore Temple at Mahabalipuram wasn’t a single temple, but the last of a series of seven temples, six of which had submerged. New finds suggest that there may be some truth to the story.

A major discovery of submerged ruins was made in April of 2002 offshore of Mahabalipuram in Tamil Nadu, South India. The discovery, at depths of 5 to 7 meters (15 to 21 feet) was made by a joint team from the Dorset based Scientific Exploration Society (SES) and marine archaeologists from India’s National Institute of Oceanography (NIO).

Investigations at each of the locations revealed stone masonry, remains of walls, square rock cut remains, scattered square and rectangular stone blocks and a big platform with steps leading to it. All these lay amidst the locally occurring geological formations of rocks.

—- 7 Most Fascinating Underwater Ruins : Oddee.com

(via oosik)

July212014

(Source: Wikipedia, via gh2u)

July172014
rayvenloaf:

OMFG this is brilliant

:)

rayvenloaf:

OMFG this is brilliant

:)

(Source: zubbyzub, via plio-cavedeposits)

July162014
historical-nonfiction:

Persian cast stone horse, a reproduction of one excavated from Persepolis, ceremonial capital of the Achaemenid Empire, or First Persian Empire (550-330 BCE)

historical-nonfiction:

Persian cast stone horse, a reproduction of one excavated from Persepolis, ceremonial capital of the Achaemenid Empire, or First Persian Empire (550-330 BCE)

(Source: ancientsculpturegallery.com, via cabinet-de-curiosites)

July152014

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

logicalabsurdity:

vsiorc:

Skeleton thought to be Etruscan warrior prince is actually a warrior princess

Prehistoric cave prints show most early artists were women

so what feminists have been saying for years and years is true. women have always been involved in hunting, have been warriors and have made art. women have been inventors and made great discoveries… and women experts are finally breaking through the sexism to get the facts heard.

"But bone analysis revealed the prince holding the lance was actually a 35- to 40-year-old woman, whereas the second skeleton belonged to a man.

Given that, what do archaeologists make of the spear?

"The spear, most likely, was placed as a symbol of union between the two deceased," Mandolesi told Viterbo News 24 on Sept. 26.

Weingarten doesn’t believe the symbol of unity explanation. Instead, she thinks the spear shows the woman’s high status.

Their explanation is “highly unlikely,” Weingarten told LiveScience. “She was buried with it next to her, not him.”

Gendered assumptions

The mix-up highlights just how easily both modern and old biases can color the interpretation of ancient graves.

In this instance, the lifestyles of the ancient Greeks and Romans may have skewed the view of the tomb. Whereas Greek women were cloistered away, Etruscan women, according to Greek historian Theopompus, were more carefree, working out, lounging nude, drinking freely, consorting with many men and raising children who did not know their fathers’ identities.

Instead of using objects found in a grave to interpret the sites, archaeologists should first rely on bone analysis or other sophisticated techniques before rushing to conclusions, Weingarten said.

"Until very recently, and sadly still in some countries, sex determination is based on grave goods. And that, in turn, is based almost entirely on our preconceptions. A clear illustration is jewelry: We associate jewelry with women, but that is nonsense in much of the ancient world," Weingarten said. "Guys liked bling, too.""

had prints are cave-art signatures…

"This is a surprise, since most archaeologists have assumed it was men who had been making the cave art. One interpretation is that early humans painted animals to influence the presence and fate of real animals that they’d find on their hunt, and it’s widely accepted that it was the men who found and killed dinner.

But a new study indicates that the majority of handprints found near cave art were made by women, based on their overall size and relative lengths of their fingers.

"The assumption that most people made was it had something to do with hunting magic," Penn State archaeologist Dean Snow, who has been scrutinizing hand prints for a decade, told NBC News. The new work challenges the theory that it was mostly men, who hunted, that made those first creative marks. 

Another reason we thought it was men all along? Male archeologists from modern society where gender roles are rigid and well-defined — they found the art. “[M]ale archaeologists were doing the work,” Snow said, and it’s possible that “had something to do with it.”  “

-MANIACAL LAUGHTER-

I can’t stop giggling over how DESPERATE male archelogists are to try and make up some bullshit to explain away the idea of women being warriors and hunters in the past

(via archaeochick)

July142014
July132014
ubu507:

greenman

ubu507:

greenman

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