August132014
August122014
tousledbirdmadgrrrl:


Corsican vendetta knife with floral detail

"may all your wounds be mortal"

tousledbirdmadgrrrl:

Corsican vendetta knife with floral detail

"may all your wounds be mortal"

(Source: anti-romanticismo, via quagmireparadigm)

August112014
de-salva:

ROCK ART IN SOUTH AMERICA - Coral Island Petroglyphs (Coral Island off the south Coast of Santa Catarina, Brazil).

de-salva:

ROCK ART IN SOUTH AMERICA - Coral Island Petroglyphs (Coral Island off the south Coast of Santa Catarina, Brazil).

(via snowonredearth)

August102014
fishstickmonkey:

Egypt - Cairo - old house and Masharabieh. Francis Firth, photographer. ca.1856-60. Library of Congress

fishstickmonkey:

Egypt - Cairo - old house and Masharabieh. Francis Firth, photographer. ca.1856-60. Library of Congress

(via fishstickmonkey)

August92014

420-bit:

Fucking quality post right here

(Source: yung-replica, via alphacaeli)

August82014
endlessquestion:

A Lacquer Painting on cardboard with the Constellation Sagittarius, Iran 19th century

endlessquestion:

A Lacquer Painting on cardboard with the Constellation Sagittarius, Iran 19th century

(via plio-cavedeposits)

August72014

mediumaevum:

Medieval Graffiti - not so rare after all

A project to record the graffiti, which began in Norfolk, has now been rolled out to other areas and is gradually spreading across England.

Armed with just a torch and a camera, a team of volunteers have recorded more than 28,000 images from churches in Norfolk alone and are a third of the way through searching Norwich Cathedral, where there are many more examples. Read on

(via cabinet-de-curiosites)

August62014
speciesbarocus:

michael_hamburg69 - Nuremberg cemetery (2014). Detail.

speciesbarocus:

michael_hamburg69 - Nuremberg cemetery (2014). Detail.

(via poisonwasthecure)

August52014
fishstickmonkey:




Plaque



Western Inner Mongolia, 5th-3rd century B.C.
Sculpture; plaques
Bronze, cast
LACMA

fishstickmonkey:

Plaque

Western Inner Mongolia, 5th-3rd century B.C.

Sculpture; plaques
Bronze, cast
August42014
ancientpeoples:

The Dying Lion, a stone panel from the North Palace of Ashurbanipal
Nineveh, northern IraqNeo-Assyrian
c.645 BC
This small alabaster panel was part of a series of wall panels that showed a royal hunt. It has long been acclaimed as a masterpiece; the skill of the Assyrian artist in the observation and realistic portrayal of the animal is clear.
Struck by one of the king’s arrows, blood gushes from the lion’s mouth. Veins stand out on its face. From a modern viewpoint, it is tempting to think that the artist sympathized with the dying animal. However, lions were regarded as symbolizing everything that was hostile to urban civilization and it is more probable that the viewer was meant to laugh, not cry.
There was a very long tradition of royal lion hunts in Mesopotamia, with similar scenes known from the late fourth millennium BC. The connection between kingship and lions was probably brought to western Europe as a result of the crusades in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries AD, when lions begin to decorate royal coats of arms.
Source: British Museum

ancientpeoples:

The Dying Lion, a stone panel from the North Palace of Ashurbanipal

Nineveh, northern Iraq
Neo-Assyrian

c.645 BC

This small alabaster panel was part of a series of wall panels that showed a royal hunt. It has long been acclaimed as a masterpiece; the skill of the Assyrian artist in the observation and realistic portrayal of the animal is clear.

Struck by one of the king’s arrows, blood gushes from the lion’s mouth. Veins stand out on its face. From a modern viewpoint, it is tempting to think that the artist sympathized with the dying animal. However, lions were regarded as symbolizing everything that was hostile to urban civilization and it is more probable that the viewer was meant to laugh, not cry.

There was a very long tradition of royal lion hunts in Mesopotamia, with similar scenes known from the late fourth millennium BC. The connection between kingship and lions was probably brought to western Europe as a result of the crusades in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries AD, when lions begin to decorate royal coats of arms.

Source: British Museum

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