April222014
deathandmysticism:

Emile Béchard | General view of the Tombs of the Caliphs | Cairo | 1887

deathandmysticism:

Emile Béchard | General view of the Tombs of the Caliphs | Cairo | 1887

(via indigenousdialogues)

April212014
lich-tung:

animus-inviolabilis:

Plaque
12th-13th century Song dynasty  Jade


//

lich-tung:

animus-inviolabilis:

Plaque

12th-13th century
Song dynasty

Jade

April202014
April192014
aleyma:

Monk-Scribe astride a wyvern, made in Germany in the mid 12th century (source).

aleyma:

Monk-Scribe astride a wyvern, made in Germany in the mid 12th century (source).

(via fishstickmonkey)

April182014

strangeremains:

The resurrection of a mortsafe that protected a corpse from body snatchers and saved the bones for archaeologists.

The theft of dead bodies in England was a common occurrence in the early 19th century because medical schools could only dissect the bodies of executed criminals, which were in short supply.  As medical schools expanded in the 18th and 19th centuries, and more people attended universities, the need for cadavers far exceeded the supply of condemned prisoners, so anatomy lecturers had to resort to doing business with unsavory resurrection men.  Resurrection men, or body snatchers, would sneak into graveyards at night and exhume the bodies of people who had just died and sell them to medical schools.  It was important that the cadavers were fresh since the anatomy lecturers needed to dissect the remains.

Body snatching became so widespread that people came up with ways to deter resurrection men from stealing the bodies of family members.  Relatives would guard a body before burial, some cemeteries installed watchtowers to discourage body snatchers after interment, and some families purchased iron contraptions, called mortsafes, in which to bury their dead.

Read more at StrangeRemains

Top Image: Mortsafe at in Greyfriars Kirkyard.

Middle Image: Mortsafe at  a church yard in Logierait, south of Pitlochry, Perthshire, Scotland.

Bottom Image: 19th century skeletal remains of a woman found buried in a mortsafe

(via lostinhistory)

April172014
rumelia:

page from the Codex Zographensis, an early Glagolitic manuscript in Old Church Slavonic from the late 10th or early 11th cent. it was found in the Zograf Bulgarian Orthodox monastery on St. Athos.

rumelia:

page from the Codex Zographensis, an early Glagolitic manuscript in Old Church Slavonic from the late 10th or early 11th cent. it was found in the Zograf Bulgarian Orthodox monastery on St. Athos.

(Source: Wikipedia, via all-proper-tea-is-theft)

April162014
ancientart:

Ancient Greek curse against an enemy during a trial.
The curse is written on a lead figurine, which was placed inside the lead container. Found in the enclosure of Aristion, dates to 420-410 BCE.
Courtesy & currently located at the Kerameikos Archaeological Museum, Athens. Photo taken by Giovanni Dall’Orto via the Wiki Commons.

ancientart:

Ancient Greek curse against an enemy during a trial.

The curse is written on a lead figurine, which was placed inside the lead container. Found in the enclosure of Aristion, dates to 420-410 BCE.

Courtesy & currently located at the Kerameikos Archaeological Museum, Athens. Photo taken by Giovanni Dall’Orto via the Wiki Commons.

April152014
medieval:

Hercules fighting dragons and lion.
15th c.

medieval:

Hercules fighting dragons and lion.

15th c.

April142014
archaeochick:

jangojips:

strangeremains:

The skeleton of the “Fighting Fairy Woman”
The skeleton of Joan Wytte (1775-1813) was part of the exhibit at the Museum of Witchcraft in Boscastle in England for 40 years.  Joan Wytte was known as the “Fighting Fairy Woman” because of her aggressive demeanor and small stature.  She was an accused witch who was jailed for assault, but died in Bodmin jail before she could be tried.  Joan’s body was not buried and her remains became an oddity that eventually ended up at the Museum of Witchcraft
The curator and owner of the Museum of Witchcraft, Graham King, had Joan’s remains analyzed by a forensic expert.  The examination revealed that the skeleton belonged to a female who was in her late 30’s, who was smoker who used a clay pipe, and had a “huge abscess in her right wisdom tooth.”
Graham King organized a funeral for the skeletal remains of Joan Wytte in 1998.  She was buried in a local wooded area, but the exact location of her grave is unknown.

What is going on with the rib cage? 

I want to say it’s from wearing a corset?

archaeochick:

jangojips:

strangeremains:

The skeleton of the “Fighting Fairy Woman”

The skeleton of Joan Wytte (1775-1813) was part of the exhibit at the Museum of Witchcraft in Boscastle in England for 40 years.  Joan Wytte was known as the “Fighting Fairy Woman” because of her aggressive demeanor and small stature.  She was an accused witch who was jailed for assault, but died in Bodmin jail before she could be tried.  Joan’s body was not buried and her remains became an oddity that eventually ended up at the Museum of Witchcraft

The curator and owner of the Museum of Witchcraft, Graham King, had Joan’s remains analyzed by a forensic expert.  The examination revealed that the skeleton belonged to a female who was in her late 30’s, who was smoker who used a clay pipe, and had a “huge abscess in her right wisdom tooth.”

Graham King organized a funeral for the skeletal remains of Joan Wytte in 1998.  She was buried in a local wooded area, but the exact location of her grave is unknown.

What is going on with the rib cage? 

I want to say it’s from wearing a corset?

April132014
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